Last week, London mayor Sadiq Khan made headlines across the UK since he announced his most recent pledge in the ongoing mayoral election race. Should he be re-elected — a risk that many are thinking of a full-scale decision — Khan intends to establish the London Drugs Commission which will evaluate the potential benefits of other strategies to cannabis. Even the mayor of London has many different functions that revolve around the efficient economic and social evolution of the capital. But could the mayor of London actually enact meaningful changes around cannabis policy? Though the London mayor might not have the ability to formally decriminalise cannabis through the law, he/she could in theory effectively attain the exact identical outcome in the funds by instructing Met officers not to detain individuals for private possession and use of cannabis.Similar steps have now been enacted in five police forces throughout the nation, including in the Thames Valley and West Midlands. Instead, these found in possession of small amounts of any medication are referred to treatment or given harm reduction information rather than criminal consequences. Nevertheless, in practice, making this shift in the funds might be more difficult.In 2020, the Independent Office for Police Conduct urged that police officers must quit carrying out search and stop steps according to smelling cannabis — a step recently echoed by the Green Party’s mayoral candidate Sian Berry. However, forces across the UK, including the Met, still refer to this rationale.Furthermore, recent findings indicate that the young. Black men in the UK are approximately 19 times more likely to be searched and stopped for suspected cannabis ownership than their white counterparts. So, what are the duties of a mayor in regards to community and race relations?Following the initial responses, Khan’s statement left some, apparently including the Prime Minister himself, questioning whether the matter was actually any one of Khan’s business. Others might wonder if a commission on cannabis reforms would be the best way to go, thinking about the often non-consequential character of these avenues of”actions”. Considered by many to be a knee-jerk response to Dark Lives Matter protests taking place around the UK in an effort to make the authorities seem like it was doing something.The long-awaited publication of the report has received substantial backlash with several communities, in addition to activist groups, charity organisations, and think-tanks, left feeling let-down by the decisions of the report. While the document accepts the presence of racism in the UK, it summarizes few recommendations that would address the issue at an institutional level.Thinking about the essence of the issue, a commission on cannabis reforms at the funds might well be another waste of time and taxpayer money — especially considering that the evidence is currently on the market. Khan’s statement was interpreted by some as a way to win votes since the election approaches, or merely a movement to seem”in touch with the people” without committing into meaningful change.In a world in which nations and jurisdictions around the world are frequently updating their approach to cannabis policy, it’s difficult to think that the evidence needed to enact a relatively modest change, such as decriminalisation, does not exist. Portugal alone has had decriminalisation in place for all drugs since 2001, with remarkable results.Additionally, the arrest rate for cannabis ownership throughout the nation has been falling year on year throughout the previous decade. The number of documented cannabis offences in London continues to be on the decrease, despite usage rates remaining roughly the same, implying a general improvement to police enforcement of cannabis legislation in the past couple of years.This change of mindset by law enforcement, paired with the advancing change to public sentiment across the UK — but particularly in the funding — and present evidence gathered from different nations, should be enough to enact significant changes without the necessity for further commissions and reports.Recent polls demonstrated that over half of Britons would currently support cannabis legalisation, increasing into two-thirds of Londoners. In general, Khan’s attitude to cannabis reforms in the funds appears to be a middle of the street strategy compared with suggestions from several other mayoral candidates.Even the Green Party candidate, as previously mentioned, has embraced a similarly mild strategy, while Liberal Democrat Siobhan Benita was vocal about her belief that cannabis should be legalised. What appears apparent is that, if Sadiq Khan be re-elected (which appears likely), it may still be a while before we see any meaningful adjustments to the approach to cannabis at London.

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Last week, London mayor Sadiq Khan made headlines across the UK since he announced his most recent pledge in the ongoing mayoral election race. Should he be re-elected — a risk that many are thinking of a full-scale decision — Khan intends to establish the London Drugs Commission which will evaluate the potential benefits of other strategies to cannabis.

Even the mayor of London has many different functions that revolve around the economic social and economic evolution of the capital.

But could the mayor of London actually enact meaningful changes around cannabis policy?

Though the London mayor might not have the ability to formally decriminalise cannabis through the law, he/she could in theory effectively attain the exact identical outcome in the funds by instructing Met officers not to detain individuals for private possession and use of cannabis.

Similar steps have now been enacted in five police forces throughout the nation, including in the Thames Valley and West Midlands. Instead, these found in possession of small amounts of any medication are referred to treatment or given harm reduction information rather than criminal consequences. Nevertheless, in practice, making this shift in the funds might be more difficult.

In 2020, the Independent Office for Police Conduct urged that police officers should quit carrying out stop and search steps based on smelling cannabis — a step recently echoed by the Green Party’s mayoral candidate Sian Berry. However, forces across the UK, including the Met, still refer to this rationale.

Furthermore, recent findings indicate that the young. Black men in the UK are approximately 19 times more likely to be searched and stopped for suspected cannabis ownership than their white counterparts. So, what are the duties of a mayor in regards to community and race relations?

Following the initial responses, Khan’s statement left some, apparently including the Prime Minister himself, questioning whether the matter was actually any one of Khan’s business. Others might wonder if a commission on cannabis reforms would be the best way to go, thinking about the often non-consequential character of these avenues of”actions”.

Considered by many to be a knee-jerk response to Black Lives Matter protests taking place around the UK in an effort to make the authorities seem as if it was doing something.

The long-awaited publication of the report has received substantial backlash with several communities, in addition to activist groups, charity organisations, and think-tanks, left feeling let-down by the decisions of the report. While the document accepts the presence of racism in the UK, it summarizes few recommendations that would address the issue at an institutional level.

Thinking about the essence of the issue, a commission on cannabis reforms at the funds might well be another waste of time and taxpayer money — especially considering that the evidence is currently on the market. Khan’s statement was interpreted by some as a way to win votes since the election approaches, or merely a movement to seem”in touch with the people” without committing into meaningful change.

In a world in which nations and jurisdictions around the world are frequently updating their approach to cannabis policy, it’s difficult to think that the evidence needed to enact a relatively modest change, such as decriminalisation, does not exist. Portugal alone has had decriminalisation in place for all drugs since 2001, with remarkable results.

Additionally, the arrest rate for cannabis ownership throughout the nation has been falling year on year throughout the previous decade. The number of documented cannabis offences in London continues to be on the decrease, despite usage rates remaining roughly the same, suggesting a general softening to police officers of cannabis legislation in the past couple of years.

This change of mindset by law enforcement, paired with the advancing change to public sentiment across the UK — but particularly in the funding — and present evidence gathered from different nations, should be enough to enact significant changes without the necessity for further commissions and reports.

Is a London Drugs Commission the Best Step for Cannabis Reform in London?

Recent polls demonstrated that over half of Britons would currently support cannabis legalisation, increasing into two-thirds of Londoners.

In general, Khan’s attitude to cannabis reforms in the funds appears to be a middle of the street strategy compared with suggestions from several other mayoral candidates.

Even the Green Party candidate, as previously mentioned, has embraced a similarly mild strategy, while Liberal Democrat Siobhan Benita was vocal about her belief that cannabis should be legalised.

What appears apparent is that, if Sadiq Khan be re-elected (which appears likely), it may still be a while before we see any meaningful adjustments to the method of cannabis at London.

Source: https://canex.co.uk/is-a-london-drugs-commission-the-best-step-for-cannabis-reform-in-london/

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