Peter Watson, agriculture director of British Sugar — that grows cannabis to be used in epilepsy medicines at Wissington in Norfolk — blamed that the recruiting problems on the principles of the seasonal agricultural workers’ scheme.The labour problems come as investments in cannabis businesses vie after several countries, like the UK, legalised using medications using extracts from the plant.British Sugar’s operation, which supplies the US firm Terrier Pharmaceuticals using ingredients for accredited anti-epilepsy medications, is among many farming companies closed from the seasonal workers’ scheme as they aren’t rising food.The scheme, still a pilot, also has this season allowed UK farmers to bring in as many as 30,000 workers from abroad for as many as six months to harvesting. It aims to replace a number of those overseas workforce who previously arrived under EU free movement.Watson said:”It’s disappointing that we’ve had a year that has been very hard because of the employee shortages at our glasshouses.”Our Everyday colleagues reside on website for both growing and harvesting intervals and we’ve employed individuals from both the UK and countries throughout Europe,” he added. “The limitations into the pilot this year have meant we’ve fought to recruit individuals.”
The limitations to the pilot this year have meant we’ve fought to recruit individuals.”
He said British Sugar wanted the government to expand the scheme to non-edible plants a year ago. “We’d like a long-term commitment from the government that the labour requirement for pharmaceutical growth is handled in the same manner as growing for food,” he said. Audrey Elliott, an employment and immigration partner at Eversheds Sutherland, the law firm, said the exclusion was hitting against companies growing plants for pharmaceuticals and people conducting research on new, much more disease-resistant or higher-yield plants.”The character of the work, often requiring concentrated work within short time intervals and residing on site, isn’t attractive or perhaps not possible for a lot of individuals,” Elliott said.Chris Tovey, principal operating officer for Jazz Pharmaceuticals in the UK © Jason Alden/BloombergBritish Sugar uses heat and carbon dioxide created by sugar manufacturing at its Wissington factory to grow cannabis within an 18-hectare glasshouse there beneath an agreement with GW Pharmaceuticals, which was bought by Jazz Pharmaceuticals in May.Jazz is the only group working in the UK at industrial scale to give licensed medications, the most highly controlled portion of the growing market to supply legal cannabis-related products. The plants are bred to have elevated levels of the CBD compound, which can help control some kinds of epilepsy.Jazz Pharmaceuticals acknowledged the difficulties, but said it had been able to satisfy its obligations to furnish medicines.”While our rising spouses have undergone some version in seasonal employee availability this season, this has not impacted our creation or outputsignal,” said Chris Tovey, principal operating officer for Jazz Pharmaceuticals in the UK.MPs recommended in a report last week that licensing of medicinal cannabinoids must be transferred from the Home Office into The Department of Health and Social Care to alleviate growth in the industry and prevent the UK”missing out to a [approximately ] #1bn medicines industry”.Until the UK’s departure from the EU single market and customs union on December 31, that ended the Brexit transition period, farms relied upon EU free movement to deliver in short-term workers. Recommended Under the new immigration policy, which concentrates on admitting skilled and higher-paid workers, agriculture is the only real industry with a scheme to deliver in low-skilled workers. It aims to cover the acute shortage of UK workers keen to undertake the demanding, often low-paid work.Flower growers have previously said they were having to allow blossoms rot due to labour shortages.The Home Office stated the conditions of the scheme wouldn’t change. “There are now no plans to enlarge the scope of the Seasonal Workers’ Pilot beyond edible horticulture and companies must concentrate on training and investing in our domestic workforce instead of relying on labour from abroad,” it said.

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The business that owns the UK’s largest cannabis manufacturing website for use in pharmaceuticals is now called for changes to immigration policy following labour shortages after it had been excluded from a visa scheme for farm workers.

Peter Watson, agriculture director of British Sugar — that grows cannabis to be used in epilepsy medicines at Wissington in Norfolk — blamed the recruiting problems on the principles of the seasonal agricultural workers’ scheme.

The labour problems come as investments in cannabis businesses vie after many countries, such as the UK, legalised using medicines using extracts from the plant.

British Sugar’s surgery, which supplies the US company Jazz Pharmaceuticals with components for licensed anti-epilepsy medications, is just one of several farming companies shut from their seasonal workers’ scheme as they aren’t rising food.

The scheme, still a pilot, has this season allowed UK farmers to bring in as many as 30,000 workers from abroad for as many as six weeks for harvesting. It aims to replace a number of those overseas workforce who previously arrived under EU free movement.

Watson said:”It’s disappointing that we’ve had a year that has been quite difficult because of the employee shortages at our glasshouses.

“Our Everyday colleagues reside on website for both growing and harvesting intervals and we’ve employed individuals from both the UK and countries throughout Europe,” he added. “The limitations into the pilot this year have meant we’ve fought to recruit individuals.”

He said British Sugar wanted the government to expand the scheme to non-edible plants a year ago. “We’d like a long-term commitment from the government that the labour requirement for pharmaceutical growth is handled in the same manner as growing for food,” he said.

Audrey Elliott, an employment and immigration partner at Eversheds Sutherland, the law firm, said the exclusion was hitting against companies growing plants for pharmaceuticals and people conducting research on new, much more disease-resistant or higher-yield plants.

“The character of the work, often requiring concentrated work within short time intervals and residing on site, isn’t attractive or perhaps not possible for a lot of individuals,” Elliott said.

Chris Tovey, chief operating officer for Jazz Pharmaceuticals in the UK
Chris Tovey, principal operating officer for Jazz Pharmaceuticals in the UK © Jason Alden/Bloomberg

British Sugar uses heat and carbon dioxide created by sugar manufacturing at its Wissington factory to grow cannabis within an 18-hectare glasshouse there beneath an agreement with GW Pharmaceuticals, which was bought by Jazz Pharmaceuticals in May.

Jazz is the only group working in the UK at industrial scale to give licensed medications, the most highly controlled portion of the growing market to supply legal cannabis-related products. The plants are bred to have elevated levels of the CBD compound, which can help control some kinds of epilepsy.

Jazz Pharmaceuticals acknowledged the difficulties, but said it had been able to satisfy its obligations to furnish medicines.

“While our rising spouses have undergone some version in seasonal employee availability this season, this has not impacted our creation or outputsignal,” said Chris Tovey, principal operating officer for Jazz Pharmaceuticals in the UK.

MPs recommended in a report last week that licensing of medicinal cannabinoids must be transferred from the Home Office into The Department of Health and Social Care to alleviate growth in the industry and prevent the UK”missing out to a [approximately ] #1bn medicines industry”.

Until the UK’s departure from the EU single market and customs union on December 31, that ended the Brexit transition period, farms relied upon EU free movement to deliver in short-term workers.

Under the new immigration policy, which concentrates on admitting skilled and higher-paid workers, agriculture is the only real industry with a scheme to deliver in low-skilled workers. It aims to cover the acute shortage of UK workers keen to undertake the demanding, often low-paid work.

Flower growers have previously said they were having to allow blossoms rot due to labour shortages.

The Home Office stated the conditions of the scheme wouldn’t change. “There are currently no plans to enlarge the scope of the Seasonal Workers’ Pilot beyond edible horticulture and companies must concentrate on training and investing in our domestic workforce instead of relying on labour from abroad,” it said.

Source: https://www.ft.com/content/496968cc-9d4f-4897-ac28-a9a888065e6b

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